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Old 3rd July 2008, 11:05 AM
bactrus bactrus is offline
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Default macamus3: Topic: Ultra highland Nepenthes system. (Read 303 times)

macamus3
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Ultra highland Nepenthes system.
Thread Started on 26 May, 2007, 21:34 Hi, I came across an article in ICPS CP newsletter March 2003 issue that details a way to set up a ultra highlang growing environment. I would like to try some harder species ie N. lowii, N. villosa, N. rajah, N. hamata etc.... This seems like the right approach. Has anyone had success with this system? If so any advice or tips. Lighting is my main concern. Was thinking about using a 270 watt High Pressure Sodium Son-Agro system that put out a full spectrum of light 47000 lumens at 3ft. What about heat from said light system. I would have to set up in garage/no windows. Please let me know as I have wanted to cultivate some highlanders for some time now but have steered away from them due to thier requirements.
Any advise would be appreciated.

Thanks,

macamus3
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Re: Ultra highland Nepenthes system.
Reply #1 on 27 May, 2007, 19:52 I am constantly confused with this "Highland" and "Ultra-Highland" systerms and terms people use for Nepenthes.

After reading about Nepenthes aristolichoides, an "Ultra Highland" plant, it turns out my conditions are perfect for it.
They are:

Temperature: Minimum of 12 Celcius year round, maximum is approximately 30.

Humidity: Medium during the day-around 60% is the average, but on cloudy days it often goes to around 80%. The humdiity at night is always over 75%, often getting into 90%.

Lighting: My greenhouse is situated in full sun but one half of it is shaded using greenhouse shading cloth, the so called "Tropical" section where Orchids and Nepenthes grow. My "Highland" Nepenthes love it-sanguinea "Black Beauty" is pitchering on every single leaf!

Ventilation: I use a clip on mini greenhouse fan to ensure that air is circulated. It works, as I have so far had very few, if any, fungul problems.

Finnaly, here is the Orchid system of temperature-you have to admit it is much more advanced and better then all that "Highland" and "Ultra Highland" rubbish.

Very Cool-Minimum 8 Celcius
Cool-Minimum 10 Celcius
Intermediate-Minimum 12 to 13 Celcius
Warm-Minimum 15 Celcius
Hot-18 Celcius and higher

If you ask me people should switch to this system for Nepenthes...it is much more efficient and when someone in the Orchid Community says to you "Cool Growing" you immediately know that the plant concerned likes a minimum of 10 Celcius, whereas if someone says to you "Highland" in the Nepenthes world, that could mean any temperature from 8 to 15 Celcius!
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Re: Ultra highland Nepenthes system.
Reply #2 on 27 May, 2007, 23:17 Haha it sounds odd saying >18C is hot, but i guess in terms of highland stuff it's true. The orchid system does seem to break down the temps into more specific parameters. But it seems trying to get everyone to use this system is like trying to get the Americans to drive on the proper side of the road XD Link to Post - Back to Top Loggedmacamus3
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Re: Ultra highland Nepenthes system.
Reply #3 on 27 May, 2007, 23:27 I agree that the orchid system would be better. I guess I am looking to grow very cool or cool plants especially N villosa which I have heard needs nights down to 5 or 6 C to grow properly. I have never kept Orchids so knew nothing about there temp scale but would be much more accurate. I to have had N. sanguinea in the past and performed very well right beside N. bicalcarata in what I would consider hot conditions. 35C day temps 25c night temps but humidity always above 65% minimum and 90% at night.

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Re: Ultra highland Nepenthes system.
Reply #4 on 28 May, 2007, 0:01 Hi macamus,

I find that 12 Celcius will suit quite a lot of things-12 Celcius is classed as Intermediate, but the nice thing about it is that a lot of the cooler species will also thrive. For example, I have Coelogyne's thriving in there, even though Coelogyne's are very cool growing Orchids.

I think N. sanguinea is a very variable and adaptable species. Mine is pitchering on every single pitcher at 12 Celcius, but as you said you and others have kept them very succesfully at much higher temperatures. I will take a picture of mine for you if you like.

If you do grow N. villosa, you would be able to grow the rare Telipogon Orchids beside them. When these were first discovered, they died instantly after being bought down from their mountain homes-which is 2900 Metres in the Andes! They require very similar temperature ranges as N. villosa(maximum day Temperature is around 20 to 25 Celcius depending on the species, and night time temperatures should be around 5 to 8 Celcius) Certainly something to look into there!

Good luck and let us know how you get on. I would reccomend you start with some Cool growing Nepenthes first though and see how you go, so you have more of an idea how you are going to provide the very Cool temperatures that N. villosa and some of these others need.





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Re: Ultra highland Nepenthes system.
Reply #5 on 28 May, 2007, 14:56 Hi cosmoking, I would love to see a picture of your N. sanguinea. As far as Orchids go I have never tried but they are very beautiful. Trying to get better with Nepenthes first but would love to try some Orchids. Any suggestions on some heat loving species????

Thanks again

macamus3
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Re: Ultra highland Nepenthes system.
Reply #6 on 28 May, 2007, 23:44 Sure, I will take a picture for you. Il take a picture of my set up aswel so you can see how I grow all my plants.

If you are new to Orchids, a good beginners species is the Phaleanopsis(Moth Orchids). They are warm to hot growing species in nature, and will absolutely love all the warmth you get in your climate. In places like Malaysia and Singapore, some people grow them mounted to trees in their gardens! Youa re best off keeping it in a pot in a sheltered place in your house though(for the Summer, a good place to keep it is around a foot or two away from an East facing windowsill.) In Winter, put them directly on the windowsill, but in Spring move them a foot away again.

Other species that will thrive in your conditions are:

Vanda Alliance-Vanda, Ascocentrum, Aerides ,Papiolanthe, and particurlarly hybrids of these.
Good species and hybrids to try are:

Vanda sanderiana
Vanda Rothschildiana
Papiolanthe Miss Agnes Joachim (The national flower of Singapore!)

In addtion, you may try any species and hybrids of these-Ascocenda's are particurlarly good(A hybrid between the genera Ascocentrum and Vanda)

However, it is very important to avoid two species: Vanda coerulea and Vanda coerulescens. These are Very Cool to Cool growing Orchids that will not enjoy the heat of your climate at all!
It would be advisable to avoid any blue Vanda Alliance hybrids aswel, as these descend from Vanda coerulea.

Paphiopedilum and Phgramipedium(Slipper Orchids):

Paphiopedilums can be split into three distinct groups:

MOTTLED leaved types like a shady position with Hot temperatures.
UNMARKED foliage types which produce a SINGLE FLOWER will like Cool growing temperatures and will sulk if they dont get them(so avoid these!)
UNMARKED foliage types which produce SEVERAL, SEQUENTIAL FLOWERS like Hot growing conditions but more light then the mottled leaved types.

Phgragmipediums tend to be Warm to Hot growing too, so they will like the heat you get but avoid two species: Phgrammipedium bessea and Phgragmipedium kovachii, as these are Cool growing species. It would be advisable to also avoid any of their descendents(Phgramipedium bessea is the only red Phgramipedium, so you can eaisly identify its hybrids, which are usually in various shades of orange and red) Phgramipedium kovachii and its hybrids are not yet readily or commercially available so you dont need to worry about that one.

Phgramipediums are easier than Paphiopedilums and you have to keep them in a tray of water like you do with CP's. Let the tray evaporate completely before adding more water. For Paphiopedilums, let them dry out in between waterings and do not stand in water.

These are the most easy to obtain groups out of the Warm and Hot growing species, but I reccomend to start with the Phaleanopsis as they are THE easiest Orchid of all, not only in the Warm and Hot growing groups but worldwide, here they eaisly adapt to cooler temperatures.

Good luck, if you need to know anything else than let me know!






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